Significant Transactions

 (unaudited)

Sal. Oppenheim. On March 15, 2010, Deutsche Bank AG (“Deutsche Bank”) closed the full acquisition of the Sal. Oppenheim Group for a total purchase price of approximately € 1.3 billion paid in cash, of which approximately € 0.3 billion was for BHF Asset Servicing GmbH (“BAS”), which is being on-sold and treated as a separate transaction apart from the remaining Sal. Oppenheim Group. The acquisition of 100 % of the voting equity interests in the Luxembourg-based holding company Sal. Oppenheim jr. & Cie. S.C.A. (“Sal. Oppenheim S.C.A.”) is based on the framework agreement reached in the fourth quarter 2009 with the previous shareholders of Sal. Oppenheim S.C.A. who have the option of acquiring a long-term shareholding of up to 20 % in the German subsidiary Sal. Oppenheim jr. & Cie. KGaA. As of the reporting date, the fair value of the option is zero. The acquisition enables the Group to strengthen its Asset and Wealth Management activities among high-net-worth private clients, family offices and trusts in Europe and especially in Germany. Sal. Oppenheim Group’s independent wealth management activities are being expanded under the well-established brand name of the traditional private bank, while preserving its unique private bank character. Its integrated asset management concept for private and institutional clients is to be retained.

As a result of the acquisition, the Group obtained control over Sal. Oppenheim S.C.A., which subsequently became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Deutsche Bank. All Sal. Oppenheim Group operations, including all of its asset management activities, the investment bank, BHF-Bank Group (“BHF-Bank”), BAS and the private equity fund of funds business managed in the separate holding Sal. Oppenheim Private Equity Partners S.A. were transferred to Deutsche Bank. Upon the acquisition, all of the Sal. Oppenheim Group businesses were integrated into the Group’s Asset and Wealth Management Corporate Division, except that BHF-Bank and BAS initially became part of the Corporate Investments Group Division. During the second quarter 2010, BHF-Bank and BAS were also transferred to the Corporate Division Asset and Wealth Management. As all significant legal and regulatory approvals had been obtained by January 29, 2010, the date of acquisition was set for that date and, accordingly, the Group commenced consolidation of Sal. Oppenheim from the first quarter 2010 onwards.

Over the course of the year 2010, Sal. Oppenheim Group is discontinuing its investment banking activities. The Equity Trading & Derivatives and Capital Markets Sales units were acquired by Australia’s Macquarie Group in the second quarter 2010. BHF-Bank is being managed as a stand-alone unit while Deutsche Bank examines various strategic options with BHF-Bank. The agreed sale of BAS to Bank of New York Mellon is expected to close in the third quarter 2010. As of June 30, 2010, BAS is accounted for as held for sale. Also, as part of the Sal. Oppenheim Group transaction, the Group acquired Services Généraux de Gestion S.A. and its subsidiaries, which were on-sold in the first quarter 2010.

The acquisition-date fair value of the total consideration transferred for the Sal. Oppenheim Group and BAS is currently expected to be approximately € 1.3 billion. However, as part of the framework agreement reached with the previous owners of Sal. Oppenheim S.C.A., the purchase price could increase by approximately up to € 0.5 billion contingent upon the future performance of specific risk positions (in particular legal and credit risk) which could materialize through 2015. As of the reporting date, the fair value estimate of the contingent consideration is zero. With fair values determined provisionally for identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed, the acquisition resulted in the recognition of goodwill and other intangible assets of approximately € 0.8 billion and € 0.2 billion, respectively. Due to the complexity of the transaction, the allocation of the purchase price and the determination of the net fair value of identifiable assets, liabilities and contingent liabilities for the Sal. Oppenheim Group as of the acquisition date is still preliminary. Accordingly, the opening balance sheet is subject to finalization.

Goodwill arising from the acquisition largely consists of synergies expected by combining certain operations in the asset and wealth management areas as well as an increased market presence in these businesses in Germany, Luxembourg, Switzerland and Austria. The goodwill is not expected to be deductible for tax purposes. Other intangible assets recognized mainly represent software, customer relationships and trade names. As part of the purchase price allocation, Deutsche Bank recognized a contingent liability of approximately € 0.4 billion for the risks inherent in certain businesses acquired from Sal. Oppenheim Group. It is expected that the liability will be settled over the next five years. Deutsche Bank continues to analyze the risks and the potential timing of outflows.

Following the acquisition but on the date of closing, Deutsche Bank made a capital injection of € 195 million to the new subsidiary Sal. Oppenheim S.C.A. This amount does not form part of the purchase consideration and accordingly is not included in the aforementioned goodwill calculation.

Acquisition-related costs recognized in the first half year of 2010 amounted to € 14 million and are included in general and administrative expenses in the Group’s income statement.

Since the acquisition, the Sal. Oppenheim Group (excluding BAS) contributed net revenues and a net loss after tax of € 224 million and € 120 million, respectively, to the Group’s income statement. If the acquisition had been effective as of January 1, 2010, the impact on the Group’s net revenues and net income in the first half of 2010 would have been € 253 million and € (148) million, respectively.

As the initial acquisition accounting for the business combination is not yet completed, certain disclosures have not yet been made. This includes information on acquired loan receivables and details of the opening balance sheet.

ABN AMRO. On April 1, 2010, Deutsche Bank AG (“Deutsche Bank”) completed the acquisition of parts of ABN AMRO Bank N.V.’s (“ABN AMRO”) commercial banking activities in the Netherlands for a total consideration of € 0.7 billion in cash. The closing followed the approval by the European Commission (EC) and other regulatory bodies. As of the closing date, Deutsche Bank obtained control over the acquired businesses and accordingly commenced consolidation in the second quarter 2010. The acquisition is a key element in Deutsche Bank’s strategy of further expanding its classic banking businesses. With the acquisition, the Group has become the fourth-largest provider of commercial banking services in the Netherlands.

The acquisition included 100 % of the voting equity interests and encompasses the following businesses:

  • two corporate client units in Amsterdam and Eindhoven, serving large corporate clients,
  • 13 commercial branches that serve small and medium-sized enterprises,
  • Rotterdam-based bank Hollandsche Bank Unie N.V. (“HBU”),
  • IFN Finance B.V., the Dutch part of ABN AMRO’s factoring unit IFN Group.

The two corporate client units, the 13 branches and HBU were renamed as Deutsche Bank Nederland N.V. immediately after the acquisition. Both Deutsche Bank Nederland N.V. and IFN Finance B.V. have become direct subsidiaries of Deutsche Bank. The acquired businesses, which serve over 34,000 clients and employ 1,300 people, are using the Deutsche Bank brand name and are part of the Group’s Global Transaction Banking Corporate Division.

Since the acquisition was only recently completed, the allocation of the purchase price and the determination of the fair values of identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed are only provisional. As the opening balance sheet is still subject to finalization, comprehensive disclosures on the fair values for identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed as of the acquisition date could not yet be made. As part of the preliminary purchase price allocation, customer relationships of approximately € 0.2 billion were identified as other intangible assets. The excess of the fair value of identifiable net assets acquired over the fair value of the total consideration transferred resulted in the recognition of negative goodwill of approximately € 0.2 billion which was recorded as a gain in other income of the Group’s income statement for the second quarter 2010. The main reason that led to the recognition of negative goodwill was the divestiture of parts of ABN AMRO’s Dutch commercial banking business and factoring services as required by the EC, following the acquisition of ABN AMRO Holding N.V. through a consortium of The Royal Bank of Scotland, Fortis Bank and Banco Santander back in October 2007. The gain recognized is treated as tax-exempt.

Under the terms and conditions of the acquisition, ABN AMRO will provide initial credit risk coverage for 75 % of all credit losses of the acquired loan portfolio (excluding IFN Finance B.V.). The maximum credit risk coverage is capped at 10 % of the portfolio volume. As of the acquisition date, the amount of the coverage totaled approximately € 0.6 billion and was recognized as an indemnification asset which is amortized over the expected average life-time of the underlying portfolio.

Acquisition-related costs recognized in the first half year of 2010 amounted to € 10 million and are included in general and administrative expenses in the Group’s income statement.

Since the acquisition and excluding the above gain recognized from negative goodwill, the acquired businesses contributed net revenues and net income of € 130 million and € 19 million, respectively, to the Group’s income statement. If the acquisition had been effective as of January 1, 2010, the effect on the Group’s net revenues and net income in the first half of 2010 (excluding the above mentioned gain from negative goodwill) would have been € 193 million and € 28 million, respectively.

Due to the complexity of the transaction, the initial acquisition accounting for the business combination is not yet completed. Accordingly, certain disclosures have not yet been made. This includes information on acquired loan receivables and details of the opening balance sheet.

Hua Xia Bank. On May 6, 2010, Deutsche Bank announced that it had signed a binding agreement to subscribe to newly issued shares in Hua Xia Bank Co. Ltd. (“Hua Xia Bank”) for a total subscription price of up to RMB 5.7 billion (€ 684 million as of June 30, 2010). Deutsche Bank’s subscription is part of a private placement of Hua Xia Bank shares to its three largest shareholders with an overall issuance value of up to RMB 20.8 billion (€ 2.5 billion as of June 30, 2010). Subject to regulatory approvals, this investment will increase Deutsche Bank’s existing equity stake in Hua Xia Bank, which is accounted for as financial asset available for sale, from 17.12 % to 19.99 % of issued capital. This transaction will affect results in future periods.

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